My Work Permit is Expired! Will I Be Deported?

You got a work permit and have been working legally in the United States for the past few months. One day, you learn that your work permit is expired. Will you be detained by ICE? How long does a work permit last anyway?

Let’s explain how long a work permit lasts first. Also known as an Employment Authorization Document, the time frame of a work permit depends on the applicant’s legal status in the U.S. and whether this is the person’s first time applying or is trying for renewal. It’s rather simple to get one – just fill out the paperwork, pay the fee, and submit it to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services.

However, work permits are only available to a limited group of immigrants. To be eligible for a permit you need to be either in the process of getting a green card or have a temporary right to be in the U.S. (to be discussed in a later blog).

A work permit is different from a work visa. A work visa is for someone who came to the country temporarily in order to work for a specific employer. A permit allows a legal immigrant to work in this country.

If you had applied for your work permit at the same time as your Adjustment of Status, then chances are the work permit is valid for about a year. If you are obtained the permit while having a visa, then the permit is valid for the duration of that visa, which is approximately 90 days.

But what does happen when it expires? Could be detained and deported by ICE? Not necessarily. ICE will not detain you unless you’re in the country illegally, have committed a crime, missed any immigration hearing dates, or have a deportation order against you. And you can always renew the work permit; but remember, you need to be in the country legally to get the permit.

If you have loved one who is detained by ICE and you need an immigration bond, we’re here to help. Contact a Houston immigration bail bondsman at Freedom Federal Bonding Agency today for more information.

 

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