Why Was My Family Member Detained By ICE?

immigrant-detention-freedom-federal-bonding-agencyYour cousin, who is an undocumented immigrant, has been arrested. When you call to find out about his bail, you learn that he is now in the custody of Immigration and Customs Enforcement. Why did the government detain your cousin? How long will he be detained? And what should your next steps be?

It’s true that the U.S. government has been detaining more and more immigrants lately. The government uses this tact as a method to handle undocumented or other types of removable immigrants. An immigrant is normally detained because it’s believed that he/she is a “fight risk.” This mean that if the person is set free, he/she may move to another location in the country or is a treat to public safety. Immigrant detention is a way that the government can keep the person secure before going to court.

There are a several reasons why ICE would detain an immigrant, including:

  • The immigrant had committed one or several crimes
  • The immigrant had arrived at the border without a visa before formally applying for asylum or refugee status
  • There is an outstanding deportation order on record, either pending or past due
  • The immigrant had missed prior immigration hearing dates

Once learning about an immigration detention, it’s important you find out where your family member has been detained. The easiest way to do this is by using the ICE detainee locator website. Remember to having important documents on hand like his/her Alien Number, work permit, or a green card. The website might not be updated with the latest information so it may be best to wait a few hours before checking. Or, called the field office nearest you.

Once you learn the specifics of your family member’s case, then your next call should be to our office. We are ready to assist you in obtaining an immigration bond for your loved one. Contact us today for a free consultation.

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